So much to do, so little time

Trying to squeeze sense out of chemical data

Archive for the ‘javascript’ tag

“Type-ahead” substructure searches

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The other day I was exchanging emails with John Van Drie regarding open challenges in cheminformatics (which I’ll say more about later). One of his comments concerned the slow speed of chemical searches

Google searches are screamingly fast, so fast that the type-ahead feature is doing the search as you key characters in.  Why are all chemical searches so sloooow? … Ideally, as you sketch your mol in, the searches should be happening at the same pace, like the typeahead feature.

Now, he doesn’t specifically mention what type of chemical search – it could be exact matches, similarity searches, substructure or pharmacophore searches. The first two can be done very quickly and lend themselves easily to type ahead type search interfaces. In light of the work my colleague has been doing, the substructure searches are now also amenable to a type ahead interface.

So I quickly put together a simple web page that lets you type in a SMILES (or SMARTS) and as you type it retrieves the results of a substructure search via the NCTT Search Server REST API. (In some cases the depiction is broken – that’s a bug on my side). Of course, typing in SMILES is not the most intuitive of interfaces. Since Trung employs the ChemDoodle sketcher, an ideal interface would respond to drawing events (say drawing a bond or adding atoms etc) and pull up matches on the fly. Another obvious extension is to rank (or filter) the results – all the while, maintaining the near real time speed of the application.

As I said before, seriously fast substructure searches. It also helps that I can build these examples via a public REST API. I’m sure there are reasons for SOAP, XML and so on. But it’s 2011. So lets help make extensions and mashups easier.

UPDATE: Yes, it’s easy to create patterns (especially with SMARTS) that DoS the server. We have some filters for excessively generic patterns; so some queries may not behave in the expected manner

Written by Rajarshi Guha

November 28th, 2011 at 4:07 pm

Playing with REST Descriptor Services

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As part of my work at IU I have been implementing a number of cheminformatics web services. Initially these were SOAP, but I realized that REST interfaces make life much easier. (also see here) As a result, a number of these services have simple REST interfaces. One such service provides molecular descriptor calculations, using the CDK as the backend. Thus by visiting  (i.e., making a HTTP GET request) a URL of the form

http://rguha.ath.cx/~rguha/cicc/rest/desc/descriptors/CC(=O)

you get a simple XML document containing a list of URL’s. Each URL represents a specific “resource”. In this context, the resource is the descriptor values for the given molecule. Thus by visiting

http://rguha.ath.cx/~rguha/cicc/rest/desc/descriptors/
org.openscience.cdk.qsar.descriptors.molecular.ALOGPDescriptor/CC(=O)C

one gets another simple XML document that lists the names and values of the AlogP descriptor. In this case, the CDK implementation evaluates AlogP, AlogP2 and molar refractivity – so there are actually three descriptor values. On the other hand something like the  molecular weight descriptor gives a single value. To just see the list of available descriptors visit

http://www.chembiogrid.org/cheminfo/rest/desc/descriptors

which gives an XML document containing a series of links. Visiting one of these links gives the “descriptor specification” – information on the vendor, version, reference to a descriptor ontology and so on.

(I should point out that the descriptors available in this service are from a pretty old version of the CDK. I really should update the descriptors to the 1.2.x versions)

Applications

This type of interface makes it easy to whip up various applications. One example is the PCA analysis of compound collections. Another one I put together today based on a conversation with Jean-Claude was a simple application to plot pairs of descriptor values for a collection of SMILES.

dppss1

The app is pretty simple (and quite slow, since it uses synchronous GET’s to the descriptor service for each SMILES and has to make two calls for each SMILES – hey, it was a quick hack!). Currently, it’s a bit restrictive – if a descriptor calculates multiple values, it will only use the first value. To see how many values a molecular descriptor calculates, see the list here.

With a little more effort one could easily have a pretty nice online descriptor calculation application rivaling a standalone application such as the the CDK descriptor GUI

Also,if you struggle with nice CSS layouts, the CSS Layout Collection is a fantastic resource. And jQuery rocks.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

January 7th, 2009 at 7:06 am