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Trying to squeeze sense out of chemical data

Archive for the ‘cheminformatics’ Category

Learning Representations – Digits, Cats and Now Molecules

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Deep learning has been getting some press in the last few months, especially with the Google paper on recognizing cats (amongst other things) from Youtube videos. The concepts underlying this machine learning approach have been around for many years, though recent work by Hinton and others have led to fast implementations of the algorithms as well as better theoretical understanding.

It took me a while to realize that deep learning is really about learning an optimal, abstract representation in an unsupervised fashion (in the general case), given a set of input features. The learned representation can be then used as input to any classifier. A key aspect to such learned representations is that they are, in general, agnostic with respect to the final task for which they are trained. In the Google “cat” project this meant that the final representation developed the concept of cats as well as faces. As pointed out by a colleague, Bengio et al have published an extensive and excellent review of this topic and Baldi also has a nice review on deep learning.

In any case, it didn’t take too long for this technique to be applied to chemical data. The recent Merck-Kaggle challenge was won by a group using deep learning, but neither their code nor approach was publicly described. A more useful discussion of deep learning in cheminformatics was recently published by Lusci et al where they develop a DAG representation of structures that is then fed to a recursive neural network (RNN). They then use the resultant representation and network model to predict aqueous solubility.

A key motivation for the new graph representation and deep learning approach was the observation

one cannot be certain that the current molecular descriptors capture all the relevant properties required for solubility prediction

A related motivation was that they desired to apply deep learning methods directly to the molecular graph, which in general, is of variable size compared to fixed length representations (fingerprints or descriptor sets). It’s an interesting approach and you can read the paper for more details, but a few things caught my eye:

  • The motivation for the DAG based structure description didn’t seem very robust. Shouldn’t a learned representation be discoverable from a set of real-valued molecular descriptors (or even fingerprints)? While it is possible that all the physical aspects of aquous solubility may not be captured in the current repetoire of molecular descriptors, I’d think that most aspects are. Certainly some characterizations may be too time consuming (QM descriptors) for a cheminformatics setting.
  • The results are not impressive, compared to pre-existing model for the datasets they used. This is all the more surprising given that the method is actually an ensemble of RNN’s. For example, in Table 2 the best RNN model has an R2 of 0.92 versus 0.91 for the pre-existing model (a 2D kernel). But R2 is usually a good metric for non-linear regression. But even the RMSE is only 0.03 units better than the pre-existing model.However, it is certainly true that the unsupervised nature of the representation learning step is quite attractive – this is evident in the case of the intrinsic solubility dataset, where they achieve similar results to the prior model. But the prior model employed a manually selected set of topological descriptors.
  • It would’ve been very interesting to look at the transferabilty of the learned representation by using it to predict another physical property unrelated (at least directly) to solubility.

One characteristic of deep learning methods is that they work better when provided a lot of training data. With the exception of the Huuskonen dataset (4000 molecules), none of the datasets used were very large. If training set size is really an issue, the Burnham solubility dataset with 57K observations would have been a good benchmark.

Overall, I don’t think the actual predictions are too impressive using this approach. But the more important aspect of the paper is the ability to learn an internal representation in an unsupervised manner and the promise of transferability of such a representation. In a way, it’d be interesting to see what an abstract representation of a molecule could be like, analogous to what a deep network thinks a cat looks like.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

July 2nd, 2013 at 2:41 am

Predictive models – Implementation vs Specification

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Benjamin Good recently asked about the existence of public repositories of predictive molecular signatures. From his description, he’s looking for platforms that are capable of deploying predictive models. The need for something like this is certainly not restricted to genomics – the QSAR field has been in need for this for many years. A few years back I described a system to deploy R models and more recently the OCHEM platform attempts to address this. Pipelining tools usually have a web deployment mode that also supports this idea. One problem faced by such platforms in the cheminformatics area is that the deployed model must include the means to evaluate the input features (a.k.a., descriptors). Depending on the licenses associated with descriptor software such a bundle may not be easily deployed. A gene-based predictor obviously doesn’t suffer from this problem, so it should be easier to implement. Benjamin points out the Synapse platform which looks quite nice, but only supports R models (not necessarily a bad thing!). A very recent candidate for generic predictive model (amongst other things) deployment is via plugins for the BARD platform.

But in my mind, the deeper issue that should be addressed is that of model specification. With a robust specification, evaluation of the model could implemented in arbitrary languages and platforms – essentially decoupling model definition and model implementation. PMML is one approach to predictive model specifications and is quite general (and a good solution for the gene predictor models that Benjamin is interested in). A field-specific example would be QSAR-ML (also see here) for QSAR models. One could then imagine repositories of model specifications, with an ecosystem of tools and services that instantiate models from these specs.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

May 1st, 2013 at 12:29 am

New version of fingerprint (3.4.9) – faster Dice similarity matrices

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I’ve just pushed a new version of the fingerprint package that contains an update provided by Abhik Seal that significantly speeds up calculation of pairwise similarity matrices when using the Dice similarity method. A ran a simple comparison using different numbers of random fingerprints (1024 bits, with 512 bits set to one, randomly) and measured the time to evaluate the pairwise similarity matrix. As you can see from the figure alongside, the new code is significantly faster (with speed ups of 450x to 500x). The code to generate the timings is below – it probably should wrapped in a loop to multiple times for each set size.

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fpls <- lapply(seq(10,300,by=10),
               function(i) sapply(1:i,
                                  function(x) random.fingerprint(1024, 512)))
times <- sapply(fpls,
                function(fpl) system.time(fp.sim.matrix(fpl, method='dice'))[3])

Written by Rajarshi Guha

October 30th, 2012 at 11:10 pm

Competitive Predictive Modeling – How Useful is it?

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While at the ACS National Meeting in Philadelphia I attended a talk by David Thompson of Boehringer Ingelheim (BI), where he spoke about a recent competition BI sponsored on Kaggle – a web site that hosts data mining competitions. In this instance, BI provided a dataset that contained only object identifiers and about 1700 numerical features and a binary dependent variable. The contest was open to anybody and who ever got the best classification model (as measured by log loss) was selected as the winner. You can read more about the details of the competition and also on Davids’ slides.

But I’m curious about the utility of such a competition. During the competition, all contestents had access to were the numerical features. So the contestants had no idea of the domain from where the data came – placing the onus on pure modeling ability and no need for domain knowledge. But in fact the dataset provided to them, as announced by David at the ACS, was the Hansen AMES mutagenicity dataset characterized using a collection of 2D descriptors (continuous topological descriptors as well as binary fingerprints).

BI included some “default” models and the winning models certainly performed better (10% for the winning model). This is not surprising, as they did not attempt build optimized models. But then we also see that the top 5 models differed only incrementally in their log loss values. Thus any one of the top 3 or 4 models could be regarded as a winner in terms of actual predictions.

What I’d really like to know is how well such an approach leads to better chemistry or biology. First, it’s clear that such an approach leads to the optimization of pure predictive performance and cannot provide insight into why the model makes an active or inactive call. In many scenario’s this is sufficient, but more often than not, domain specific diagnostics are invaluable. Second, how does the relative increase in model performance lead to better decision making? Granted, the crowd-sourced, gamified approach is a nice way to eke out the last bits of predictive performance on a dataset – but does it really matter that one model performs 1% better than the next best model? The fact that the winning model was 10% better than the “default” BI model is not too informative. So a specific qustion I have is, was there a benefit, in terms of model performance, and downstream decision making by asking the crowd for a better model, compared to what BI had developed using (implicit or explicit) chemical knowledge?

My motivation is to try and understand whether the winning model was an incremental improvement or whether it was a significant jump, not just in terms of numerical performance, but in terms of the predicted chemistry/biology. People have been making noises of how data trumps knowledge (or rather hypotheses and models) and I believe that in some cases this can be true. But I also wonder to what extent this holds for chemical data mining.

But it’s equally important to understand what such a model is to be used for. In a virtual screening scenario, one could probably ignore interpretability and go for pure predictive performance. In such cases, for increasingly large libraries, it might make sense for one to have a model that s 1% better than the state of the art. (In fact, there was a very interesting talk by Nigel Duffy of Numerate, where he spoke about a closed form, analytical expression for the hit rate in a virtual screen, which indicates that for improvements in the overall performance of a VS workflow, the best investment is to increase the accuracy of the predictive model. Indeed, his results seem to indicate that even incremental improvements in model accuracy lead to a decent boost to the hit rate).

I want to stress that I’m not claiming that BI (or any other organization involved in this type of activity) has the absolute best models and that nobody can do better. I firmly believe that however good you are at something, there’s likely to be someone better at it (after all, there are 6 billion people in the world). But I’d also like to know how and whether incrementally better models do when put to the test of real, prospective predictions.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

August 22nd, 2012 at 9:02 pm

I’d Rather Be … Reverse Engineering

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Gamification is a hot topic and companies such as Tunedit and Kaggle are succesfully hosting a variety of data mining competitions. These competitions employ data from a variety of domains such as bond trading, essay scoring and so on. Recently, both platforms have hosted a QSAR challenge (though not officially denoted as such). The most recent one is the challenge hosted at Kaggle by Boehringer Ingelheim.

While it’s good to see these competitions raise the profile of “data science” (and make some money for the winners), I must admit that these are not particularly interesting to me as it really boils down to looking at numbers with no context (aka domain knowledge). For example, in the Kaggle & BI example, there are 1,776 descriptors that have been normalized but no indication of the chemistry or biology. One could ask whether a certain mechanism of action is known to play a role in the biology being tested which could suggest a certain class of descriptors over another. Alternatively, one could ask whether there are a few distinct chemotypes present thus suggesting multiple local models versus a single global model. (I suppose that the supplied descriptors may lend themselves to a clustering, but a scaffold based approach would be much more direct and chemically intuitive).

This is not to say that such competitions are useless. On the contrary, lack of domain knowledge doesn’t preclude one from apply sophisticated statistical and machine learning methods to unannotated data and obtaining impressive results. The issue of data versus domain knowledge has been discussed in several places.

In contrast to the currently hosted challenge at Kaggle, an interesting twist would be to try and reverse engineer the structures from their descriptor values. There have been some previous discussions on reverse engineering structures from descriptor data. Obviously, we’re not going to be able to verify our results, but it would be an interesting challenge.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

April 6th, 2012 at 4:16 am