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Trying to squeeze sense out of chemical data

Archive for the ‘Literature’ Category

Deep Learning in Chemistry

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Deep learning (DL) is all the rage these days and this approach to predictive modeling is being applied to a wide variety of problems, including many in computational drug discovery. As a dilettante in the area of deep learning, I’ve been following papers that have used DL for cheminformatics problems, and thought I’d mention a few that seemed interesting.

An obvious outcome of a DL model is more accurate predictions, and as a result most applications of DL in drug discovery have focused on the use of DL models as more accurate regression or classification models. Examples include Lusci et al [2013], Xu et al [2015] and Ma et al [2015]. It’s interesting to note that in these papers, while DL models show better performance, it’s not consistent and the actual increase in performance is not necessarily very large (for the effort required). Eakins [2016] has reviewed the use of DL models in QSAR settings and more recently Winkler & Le [2016] have also briefly reviewed this area.

However, simply replacing one regression method with another is not particularly interesting. Indeed, as pointed by several workers (e.g., Shao et al [2013]) input descriptors, rather than modeling method, have greater effect on predictive accuracy. And so it’s the topic of representation learning that I think DL methods become interesting and useful in the area of cheminformatics.

Several groups have published work on using DL methods to learn a representation of the molecular structure, directly from the graph representation. Duvenaud et al [2016] and Kearnes et al [2016] both have described these approaches and the nice thing is that this alleviates the need to choose and select features a priori. The downside is that the learned features are optimal in the context of the training data (thus necessitating large training sets to allow for learned features that are generalizable). Interestingly, on reading Kearnes et al [2016], the features that are learned by the DL model are conceptually similar to circular fingerprints. More interestingly, when they built predictive neural network models using the learned representation, the RMSE was not significantly different from a random forest model using circular fingerprints. Of course, the learned representation is driven by the architecture of the DL model, which was designed to look at atom neighborhoods, so it’s probably not too surprising that the optimal representations was essentially equivalent to a circular fingerprint. But one can expect that tweaking the DL architecture and going beyond the molecular graph could lead to more useful representations. Also, this paper very clearly describes the hows and whys of designing a deep neural network architecture, and is useful for someone interested in exploring further.

Another interesting development is the use of DL to learn a continuous representation of a molecular structure, that can then be modified (usually in a manner to vary some molecular property) and “decoded” to obtain a new chemical structure with the desired molecular property. This falls into the class of inverse QSAR problems and Gomez-Bombarelli et al [2016] present a nice example of this approach, where gradient descent is used to explore chemical space defined by the learned continuous representation. Unfortunately the chemistry represented by the generated structures has several problems as described by Derek Lowe. While this problem has been addressed before (e.g., Wong et al [2009] with SVM, Miyao et al [2016], Skvortsova et al [1993]), these efforts have started with pre-defined feature sets. The current works key contribution is the ability to generate a continuous chemical space and I assume the nonsensical regions of the space could be avoided using appropriate filters.

Winkler & Le [2016] recently reported a comparison of deep and shallow neural networks for QSAR regression. Their results and conclusions are similar to previous work. But more tantalizingly, they make the claim that DNN’s may be better suited to tackle the prediction of activity cliffs. There has been some work on this topic (Guha [2012] and Heikamp et al [2012]) but given that activity cliffs are essentially discontinuities in a SAR surface (either fundamentally or by choice of descriptors), traditional predictive models are unlikely to do well. Winkler & Le point to work that suggests that activity cliffs may “disappear” if an appropriately high dimensionality descriptor space is used, and conclude that learned representations via DL may be useful for this. Though I don’t discount this, I’m not convinced that simply moving to higher dimensional spaces is sufficient (or even necessary) – if it were, SVM‘s should be good at predicting activity cliffs. Rather, it’s the correct set of features, that captures the phenomenon underlying the cliff, that are necessary. Nonetheless, Winkler & Le [2016] raise some interesting questions regarding the smoothness of chemical spaces.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

November 8th, 2016 at 6:23 pm

Database Licensing & Sustainability

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Update (07/28/16): DrugBank/OMx have updated the licensing conditions for DrugBank data in response to concerns raised earlier by various people and groups. See here for a detailed response from Craig Knox

A few days back I came across, via my Twitter network, the news that DrugBank had changed their licensing policy to CC BY-SA-NC 4.0. As such this is not a remarkable change (though one could argue about the NC clause, since as John Overington points out the distinction between commercial and non-commercial usage can be murky). However, on top of this license, the EULA listed a number of more restrictive conditions on reuse of the data. See this thread on ThinkLab for a more detailed discussion and breakdown.

This led to discussion amongst a variety of people regarding the sustainability of data resources. In this case while DrugBank was (and is) funded by federal grants, these are not guaranteed in perpetuity. And thus DrugBank, and indeed any resource, needs to have a plan to sustain itself. Charging for commercial access is one such approach. While it can be  problematic for reuse and other Open projects, one cannot fault the developers if they choose a path that enables them to continue to build upon their work.

Interestingly, the Guide to Pharmacology resource posted a response to the DrugBank license change, in which they don’t comment on the DrugBank decision but do point out that

The British Pharmacological Society (BPS) has committed support for GtoPdb until 2020 and the Wellcome Trust support for GtoImmuPdb until 2018. Needless to say the management team (between, IUPHAR, BPS and the University of Edinburgh) are engaged in sustainability planning beyond those dates. We have also just applied for UK ELIXIR Node consideration.

So it’s nice to see that the resource is completely free of any onerous restrictions until 2020. I have no doubt that the management team will be working hard to secure funding beyond that date. But in case they don’t, will their licensing also change to support some form of commercialization? Certainly, other resources are going down that path. John Overington pointed to BioCyc switching to a subscription model

 

So the sustainability of data resources is an ongoing problem, and will become a bigger issue as the links between resources grows over time. Economic considerations would suggest that permanent funding of every database  cannot happen.

So clearly, some resources will win and some will lose, and the winners will not stay winners forever.

Open source software & transferring leadership

However in contrast to databases, many Open Source software projects do continue development over pretty long time periods. Some of these projects receive public funding and also provide dual licensing options, allowing for income from industrial users.

However there are others which are not heavily funded, yet continue to develop. My favorite example is Jmol which has been in existence for more than 15 years and has remained completely Open Source. One of the key features of this project is that the leadership has passed from one individual to another over the years, starting I think with Dan Gezelter, then Bradley Smith, Egon Willighagen, Miguel Rojas and currently Bob Hanson.

Comparing Open software to Open databases is not fully correct. But this notion of leadership transition is something that could play a useful role in sustaining databases. Thus, if group X cannot raise funding for continued development, maybe group Y (that obviously benefits from the database) that has funding, could take over development and maintenance.

There are obvious reasons that this won’t work – maybe the expertise resides only in group X? I doubt this is really an issue, at least for non-niche databases. One could also argue that this approach is a sort of proto-crowdsourcing approach. While crowdsourcing did come up in the Twitter thread, I’m not convinced this is a scalable approach to sustainability. The “diffuse motivation” of a crowd is quite distinct from the “focused motivation” of a dedicated group. And on top of that, many databases are specialized and the relevant crowd is rather small.

One ultimate solution is that governments host databases in perpetuity. This raises a myriad issues. Does it imply storage and no development? Is this for all publicly funded databases? Or a subset? Who are the chosen ones? And of course, how long will the government pay for it? The NIH Commons, while not being designed for database persistence, is one such prototypical infrastructure that could start addressing these questions.

In conclusion, the issue of database sustainability is problematic and unsolved and the problem is only going to get worse. While unfortunate for Open science (and science in general) the commercialization of databases will always be a possibility. One hopes that in such cases, a balance will be struck between income and free (re)usage of these valuable resources.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

May 14th, 2016 at 7:26 pm

Analysing Differential Activity in Dose Response Screens

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My colleagues and I recently published a paper where we explored a few methods to identify differential behavior in dose response screens. While there is an extensive literature about analyzing differential effects in genomic data (e.g. mciroarrays, RNAseq), these methods are based on distributional assumptions that holds for genomic data. This is not necessarily the case for small molecule, dose response data. A separate post will explore this aspect.

So we couldn’t directly apply the methods devised for genomic data. Another issue that we wanted to address was the lack of replicates. As a result certain methods are excluded from consideration (e.g., t-test based methods). The simplest case (or what we refer to as obviously differential) is when a compound is active in one treatment and completely inactive in the other. This is trivial to characterize. The next method we considered was to look at fold changes for individual curve fit parameters and then choose an arbitrary threshold. This is not a particularly robust approach, and has no real statistical basis. However, such thresholding is still used in a number of scenarios (e.g., cherry picking in single point screens). In addition, in this approach you have to choose one of many parameters. So finally, we considered a data fusion approach, that ranked compounds using the rank product method. This method employed potency, response at the highest concentration and the AUC. The nice thing about this method is that it doesn’t require choosing a threshold, provides an empirical p-value and is flexible enough to include other relevant parameters (say, physicochemical properties).

Finally, we examined how single point data (modeled using the response at the highest concentration) compared to dose response data at identifying differential actives. As one might expect, the obviously differential compounds were easily identified. However for compounds active in both treatments, the single point approach led to more false positives. Thus, even those dose response is more resource-intensive, the improved accuracy makes it worth it.

In the next post I’ll look at some of the issues that didn’t make in to this paper – in particular hypothesis based tests that focus on testing differences between model fits. One key observation (also suggested by Gelman) is that strict p-value cutoffs lead one to focus on obvious or well-known effects. For small-scale exploratory analyses such as described in this paper, a more relaxed threshold of 0.1 might be more suitable, allowing marginal effects that may, however, be biologically interesting to be considered.

Written by Rajarshi Guha

May 2nd, 2016 at 2:10 am

vSDC, Rank Products and DUD-E

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This post is a follow-up to my previous discussion on a paper by Chaput et al. The gist of that paper was that in a virtual screening scenario where a small number of hits are to be selected for followup, one could use an ensemble of docking methods, identify compounds whose scores were beyond 2SD of the mean for each method and take the intersection. My post suggested that a non-parametric approach (rank products, RP) performed similarly to the parametric approach of Chaput et al on the two targets they screened.

The authors also performed a benchmark comparison of their consensus method (vSDC) versus the individual docking methods for 102 DUD-E targets. I was able to obtain the individual docking scores (Glide, Surflex, FlexX and GOLD) for each of the targets, with the aim of applying the rank product method described previously.

In short, I reproduced Figure 6A (excluding the curve for vSDC). In
th0this figure, \(n_{test}\) is the number of compounds selected (from the ranked list, either by individual docking scores or by the rank product) and \(T_{h>0}\) is the percentage of targets for which the \(n_{test}\) selected compounds included one or more actives. Code is available here, but you’ll need to get in touch with the authors for the DUD-E docking scores.

As shown alongside, the RP method (as expected) outperforms the individual docking methods. And visual comparison with the original figure suggests that it also outperforms vSDC, especially at lower values of \(n_{test}\). While I wouldn’t regard the better performance of RP compared to vSDC as a huge jump, the absence of a threshold certainly works in its favor.

One could certainly explore ranking approaches in more depth. As suggested by Abhik Seal, Borda or Condorcet methods could be examined (though the small number of docking methods, a.k.a., voter, could be problematic).

UPDATE: After a clarification from Liliane Mouawad it turns out there was a mistake in the ranking of the Surflex docking scores. Correcting that bug fixes my reproduction of Figure 6A so that the curves for individual docking methods match the original. But more interestingly, the performance of RP is now clearly better than every individual method and the vSDC method as well, at all values of \(n_{test}\)

Written by Rajarshi Guha

February 13th, 2016 at 7:25 pm

Hit Selection When You’re Strapped for Cash

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I came across a paper from Chaput et al that describes an approach to hit selection from a virtual screen (using docking), when follow-up resources are limited (a common scenario in many academic labs). Their approach is based on using multiple docking programs. As they (and others) have pointed out, there is a wide divergence between the rankings of compounds generated using different programs. Hence the motivation for a consensus approach, based on the estimating the standard deviation (SD) of scores generated by a given program and computing the intersection of compounds whose scores are greater than 2 standard deviations from the mean, in each program. Based on this rule, they selected relatively few compounds – just 14 to 22, depending on the target and confirmed at least one of them for each target. This represents less than 0.5% of their screening deck.

However, their method is parametric – you need to select a SD threshold. I was interested in seeing whether a non-parametric, ranking based approach would allow one to retrieve a subset that included the actives identified by the authors. The method is essentially the rank product method applied to the docking scores. That is, the compounds are ranked based on their docking scores and the “ensemble rank” for a compound is the product of its ranks according to each of the four programs. In contrast to the original definition, I used a sum log rank to avoid overflow issues. So the ensemble rank for the \(i\)’th compound is given by

\(R_i = \sum_{j=1}^{4} \log r_{ij}\)

where \(r_{ij}\) is the rank of the \(i\)’th compound in the \(j\)’th docking program. Compounds are then selected based on their ensemble rank. Obviously this doesn’t give you a selection per se. Instead, this allows you to select as many compounds as you want or need. Importantly, it allows you to introduce external factors (cost, synthetic feasibility, ADME properties, etc.) as additional rankings that can be included in the ensemble rank.

Using the docking scores for Calcineurin and Histone Binding Protein (Hbp) provided by Liliane Mouawad (though all the data really should’ve been included in the paper) I applied this method using the code below

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library(stringr)
d <- read.table('http://cmib.curie.fr/sites/u759/files/document/score_vs_cn.txt',
                header=TRUE, comment='')
names(d) <- c('molid', 'Surflex', 'Glide', 'Flexx', 'GOLD')
d$GOLD <- -1*d$GOLD ## Since higher scores are better
ranks <- apply(d[,-1], 2, rank)
lranks <- rowSums(log(ranks))
tmp <- data.frame(molid=d[,1], ranks, lrp=rp)
tmp <- tmp[order(tmp$lrp),]
which(str_detect(tmp$molid, 'ACTIVE'))

and identified the single active for Hbp at ensemble rank 8 and the three actives for Calcineurin at ranks 3, 5 and 25. Of course, if you were selecting only the top 3 you would’ve missed the Calcineurin hit and only have gotten 1/3 of the HBP hits. However, as the authors nicely showed, manual inspection of the binding poses is crucial to making an informed selection. The ranking is just a starting point.

Update: Docking scores for Calcineurin and Hbp are now available

Written by Rajarshi Guha

February 5th, 2016 at 1:36 am